“What do you mean you didn’t bring hiking boots?” My brother asks, exasperated. I shrug and he starts wondering aloud if his friends can supply me crampons along with hiking poles and snow gear.

“Um, you know your sister is pregnant, right?” My dad asks dubiously, not for the first time.

My brother gives me a quick glance, decides that I will be fine, and continues muttering about the snow pack levels and the need to pick up some M&M’s.

I can’t wimp out now. There are M&M’s involved. I tie plastic grocery bags over my socks, put on my running shoes, and figure I’d be good to go.

And I was! We took the West Fork Foss River Trail eight gorgeous miles (four up and four down) past two lakes, over two bridges, and past some of the biggest trees I’d seen since my trip to the Redwoods. The trail held the prefect hiking combinations: It was long and  challenging, there was unexpected scenery, it was just a little scary, and we all felt the need to high five each other upon reaching our destination.  

The first 1.5 miles to Trout Lake was pretty easy. The trail was great and included a new bridge, so river crossing wasn’t a problem. (Yet) We pulled into the picnicking spot along the lake and all the guys in the group immediately began throwing rocks into the water. What is it about guys and throwing rocks? I don’t think I’ve ever been near water without some male trying to skip a rock across it. This phenomena holds true from my friend’s 1 year old son to my 65 year old father. After all the good skipping stones had been hurled into Trout Lake we continued on.  

The trail got a little steeper after Trout Lake, but still easy to follow and the views of waterfalls, valleys, etc. were great. There were a couple snowy patches, but nothing I couldn’t stomp through in my running shoes. Trickles of water started running down the trail, but my water-proof socks/grocery bags held up quite nicely.  

At mile 3 (or possibly 3.5) things get tough. The river creates a waterfall across the trail and there was nothing but snow from here on out. My brother’s friend fished some yaktrax out of her bag and helped me pull them over my shoes for the upcoming snow. I don’t think I would have continued if not for the extra traction.

The river was a little sketchy, but not exactly a death trap. My primary goal was to not fall in the water (goal attained), with a secondary goal to keep my shoes dry (goal NOT attained). The dog hiking with us picked up on the tension as we all crossed the river and let out an uncharacteristic bark. The scariest part wasn’t the river though, it was looking up at the bridge we had to cross. From down below it looked like nothing but a log stretched across a waterfall with banks of snow on each side. When we got closer it turned out to be a legitimate bridge, so all was well.  

The rest of the trail to Coppe rLake and the two lakes beyond was completely covered in snow. Not having skills in the finding-the-trail-in-the-snow arena, I wouldn’t have continued on by myself, but another one of my brother’s friends took the lead and we all confidently trekked after him. He did not disappoint. After a little bit of wandering around (including trekking across some not-so-safe snow banks where sliding and post hole possibilities were numerous) we found a frozen pond, and Copper Lake beyond.

To celebrate a propane stove was whipped out and we all had grilled cheese sandwiches and hot cocoa. I am totally bringing such a stove with me on my next big hike. Words can’t even describe how much better the melted cheese was compared to the peanut butter-Dorito sandwich that I had packed. After lunch everyone (except my pregnant self) took advance of the great sledding opportunities above the lake. This kinda freaked out the dog, who kept trying to save people from flying down the hill.

We got back to the empty trail parking lot right before nightfall (a little after 9:00pm, up here in the Pacific Northwest), and exchanged those high-fives for a day well spent.   

To get to the trail head, Drive US 2 east towards Skykomish. Continue east for 1.9 miles, passing the Forest Service ranger station. Pick up a $5 trail pass here. Turn right ontoFoss River Road(Forest Road 68). Continue for 4.7 miles (the pavement ends at 1.1 miles), turning left onto FR 6835. Follow this road for 1.9 miles to its end and the trailhead. There is a very clean and not-bad-smelling pit toilet at the trailhead.